GLASS EYE PIX Sizzle Reel The Larry Fessenden Collection The Ranger LIKE ME PSYCHOPATHS MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND Stake Land II STRAY BULLETS Darling ABCs of Death 2: N is for NEXUS Until Dawn Until Dawn: Rush of Blood LATE PHASES How Jesus Took America Hostage — “American Jesus” the Movie New Doc BIRTH OF THE LIVING DEAD Explores the Impact of the Ground-Breaking Horror Film NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD BENEATH THE COMEDY THE INNKEEPERS HYPOTHERMIA STAKE LAND BITTER FEAST THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL I CAN SEE YOU WENDY & LUCY Liberty Kid I SELL THE DEAD Tales From Beyond The Pale Glass Eye Pix Comix SUDDEN STORM: A Wendigo Reader, paperbound book curated by Larry Fessenden Satan Hates You Trigger Man Automatons THE ROOST THE LAST WINTER WENDIGO HABIT No Telling / The Frankenstein Complex Impact Addict Videos
December 21, 2017
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PSYCHOPATHS available on VOD Jan 2 / Fessenden and Keating on Trunkspace

From TrunkSpace:

Chilling Out is where TrunkSpace talks all things horror and genre with those who work in the projects that give us the thrills and chills to keep coming back for more. This time out we’re chatting with horror icon Larry Fessenden, actor and CEO of Glass Eye Pix, whose latest film, “Psychopaths,” arrives on digital home entertainment January 2.

We recently sat down with Fessenden to discuss his creative simpatico with director Mickey Keating, why he loves working in genre films, and how he became an unexpected legend to fans of horror filmmaking.

Read whole interview here

Read the TrunkSpace Interview with Psychopaths director here

December 20, 2017
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NY TIMES: “Video Game Creators Seek Out Hollywood for Robust Narratives”

Reznick and Fessenden highlighted in New York Times article
on video game writing by Laura Parker published 12.20.17

Supermassive Games, the maker of Until Dawn (shown here),
hired the screenwriter and director Larry Fessenden to develop the game’s story.

From the article:

When Pete Samuels, a founder and the chief executive of Supermassive Games, began working on a survival horror adventure video game called Until Dawn in 2015, he knew he wanted the story to unfold like that of a horror film.

So he turned to Hollywood. Mr. Samuels sought out Larry Fessenden, an American screenwriter and director whose credits include the horror films “Wendigo” and “The Last Winter,” and the screenplay for “Orphanage,” an in-development English language remake of the Spanish horror film “El Orfanato” from the director Guillermo del Toro.

“The gaming audience is growing, and tastes are broadening,” Mr. Samuels said. “Great films and great television that tell good stories are more widely available to many more people than ever before, and there’s definitely an increasing population of the gaming audience that are enthusiastic for games with a thoughtfully constructed narrative.”

For now, building robust and dynamic stories can still be difficult, especially in games that have several outcomes depending on what each player decides. When developing the story for Until Dawn, for example, Mr. Fessenden worked with a collaborator, the writer and director Graham Reznick, whose credits include the 2008 experimental horror feature film “I Can See You.” Together, they crafted a creepy cabin-in-the-woods story focused on a group of teenagers.

The game was conceived as a first-person game, which Mr. Reznick said felt “much less cinematic.” Supermassive Games then decided to switch to a third-person perspective, and began employing techniques usually reserved for films, like fixed camera angles, editing between shots, and high resolution facial capture for the actors.

“This let us actually write dialogue and express ideas closer to how we would in film — a loaded glance in a cutaway could be much more powerful than a line of dialogue shouted from offscreen,” Mr. Reznick said.

In the game’s final version, players can alternate among characters during the game, making decisions that affect the outcome. The game, which features the voices and likeness of the actors Rami Malek and Hayden Panettiere, was released on the PlayStation 4 in 2015. It later won a British Academy of Film and Television Arts award for its originality.

Read whole article at the NY Times

December 20, 2017
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Tis the season: Fessenden’s SANTA CLAWS! Happy holidays!

Head on over to Beck Underwood’s Creepy Christmas for more Yule Tide fun.

December 14, 2017
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BLOODY DISGUSTING: Doug Jones’ 10 Memorable roles include Fessenden’s SKIN AND BONES

Not THAT Doug Jones, OUR Doug Jones! Fessenden honored to be featured in this article about the fantastic Doug Jones with a nice blurb about SKIN AND BONES (and a photo in the headliner!) Jones currently slithering (and scoring!) in THE SHAPE OF WATER by GDT.

 

FROM THE ARTICLE by Meagan Navarro:

Actor and contortionist Doug Jones is currently generating Oscar buzz for his performance as Amphibian Man in Guillermo del Toro’s latest, The Shape of Water. Like most of his roles, Jones is unrecognizable as the otherworldly creature bearing resemblance to the titular character from Creature of the Black Lagoon. Through heavy makeup and prosthetics, Jones is able to convey a depth of emotion with his movement and body language alone. His uncanny knack for physical acting is something very few actors can even hold a candle to, which is why the actor has a long history of bringing unique characters to life on screen, both big and small.  His tall, lean frame lends a striking silhouette and presence, but his use of his expressive hands demonstrates why he’s not just a perennial favorite of del Toro’s, but a go-to actor for extraordinary character work.

Fear Itself (“Skin and Bones”) – Grady Edlund

This short-lived, underrated horror anthology series was derailed by the 2008 Summer Olympics, which is a shame, because Doug Jones’ work in the episode Skin and Bones was pure nightmare fuel. The episode is directed by Larry Fessenden, a director with a history of exploring Wendigo folklore, and between his execution of building suspense and Jones’ alternating between sympathy and downright ominous cruelty, Skin and Bones is one of the best hours of television ever. As the emaciated Grady, who returns after disappearing into the mountains with a group of men days ago, Jones delivers some of the most nail-biting scenes ever, like the chilling scene where he licks his wife Helen’s arm while she’s trying to feed him back to health. Jones may look like a frail skeleton in this role, but he exudes evil power.

Read the whole list here!

December 14, 2017
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Stray Bullets among pictures cited in celebration of Hudson Valley Film Production

From the Upstater:

It’s no secret that the Hudson Valley is home to countless Hollywood movie stars and producers—its lush and beautiful landscapes and proximity to New York City providing the best of both worlds. Though a handful of films have showcased the area over the decades, its cinematic footprint paled in comparison to other regions due to a flawed state program that didn’t consider the Hudson Valley “upstate.”

But that’s all changing. Last year, after significant advocacy from Ulster County Executive Mike Hein, New York State passed legislation allowing Ulster County and a handful of other left-behinds to finally compete for productions by offering the same 40-percent tax credit allotted to the rest of upstate New York. The legislation was signed by the governor in November 2016, and as a result, the entire Mid-Hudson region is now included and will benefit.

Recent months have seen Ulster County evolving into a hotbed for major movie productions…

Stray Bullets (2017)
Written and directed by 16-year-old wunderkind Jack Fessenden (with a little help from his father, veteran indie filmmaker Larry Fessenden), Stray Bullets follows two teenage boys who accidentally collide with a group of armed robbers on the run. Filmed across Ulster County, in Stone Ridge, Rosendale, Kingston, Woodstock and West Shokan.

Read full article here

December 1, 2017
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FSR — Guillermo del Toro’s Un-Made Films #40: THE ORPHANAGE by Larry Fessenden

FILM SCHOOL REJECTS:

To mark the release of ‘The Shape of Water,’ we’ve compiled a list of Guillermo del Toro projects we probably won’t ever get to see.

The arrival of a new Guillermo del Toro movie is always an exciting time to be alive. Whether it’s a low key genre project or a big monster blockbuster, the Mexican director knows how to hit the sweet spot of many a film fan — especially those of us who appreciate all things fantastical, spooky, and strange.

GDT is also a filmmaker with a devout cult fan base, which means some of us cling to his every word more than we should sometimes. When he announces a new project or even suggests one as a throwaway notion, our collective hopes rise to the heavens. Shortly after, though, they fall back down to earth as we’ve learned by now to accept that most of the projects the great man mentions rarely materialize.

Even though his movies have brought so much magic and joy to our lives, the projects that never came to be have brought us heartache and a case of wondering what could have been. It’s not his fault by any means — and we should appreciate what we have — but when a filmmaker captures hearts and imaginations as majestically as del Toro does, it’s impossible not to yearn for the movies and TV shows that never came to be.

With that being said, let’s reflect on the projects he’s been associated with throughout the years in some capacity and determine whether or not they’ll ever escape development hell. After all, as the great Canadian poet Justin Bieber once said, “never say never.”

#40 THE ORPHANAGE

What was it? In 2007, it was announced that del Toro would serve as an executive producer on an American remake of the Spanish chiller The Orphanage, which he also produced. Larry Fessenden was being lined up to direct the feature, and, in 2011, Amy Adamswas being touted to star.

Will it ever happen? The last shred of news came in 2013, stating that the remake was still happening at some point. The camp has been quiet since, but you can never ever rule out an English-language remake of a successful foreign horror film.
Read more at Film School Rejects

December 1, 2017
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Mickey Keating’s PSYCHOPATHS Opens Today!

PSYCHOPATHS by Mickey Keating
Now in Theaters

November 30, 2017
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Exclusive Interview: Mickey Keating, Ashley Bell and Fessenden talk PSYCHOPATHS

From Rue Morgue:

It’s likely you haven’t seen as many different kinds of insanity in one film as you have in PSYCHOPATHS, which hits theaters this Friday, December 1. It’s the latest and most ambitious film from rising horror auteur Mickey Keating (DARLING, CARNAGE PARK), who talks about it with RUE MORGUE below, along with two of his stars.

Released by Samuel Goldwyn Films, PSYCHOPATHS was produced by Glass Eye Pix, whose CEO Larry Fessenden plays serial killer Henry Earl Starkweather. He introduces us to the film’s bizarre world, inhabited by characters including Alice (THE LAST EXORCISM’s Ashley Bell), whose deranged alter ego resides in a mindscape modeled on vintage musicals. Other crazy folks whose stories crisscross through the movie are played by James Landry Hébert, THE BATTERY director/star Jeremy Gardner, TRASH FIRE’s Angela Trimbur and Sam Zimmerman, curator of the Shudder streaming network, which premiered Keating’s in-depth horror talk show THE CORE this month. For the filmmaker, who has homaged numerous scary subgenres in his past features, PSYCHOPATHS was an opportunity to explore a different kind of narrative, one as fractured as its antagonists’ minds. We spoke with Keating, Fessenden and Bell following the movie’s premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival earlier this year.

Check out the full interview HERE

November 30, 2017
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Meet ALICE: Psychopath #3

In theaters Friday!

November 29, 2017
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Meet MASK: Psychopath #2

In theaters Friday!