GLASS EYE PIX Sizzle Reel The Larry Fessenden Collection PSYCHOPATHS MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND LIKE ME Stake Land II STRAY BULLETS Darling ABCs of Death 2: N is for NEXUS Until Dawn Until Dawn: Rush of Blood LATE PHASES How Jesus Took America Hostage — “American Jesus” the Movie New Doc BIRTH OF THE LIVING DEAD Explores the Impact of the Ground-Breaking Horror Film NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD BENEATH THE COMEDY THE INNKEEPERS HYPOTHERMIA STAKE LAND BITTER FEAST THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL I CAN SEE YOU WENDY & LUCY Liberty Kid I SELL THE DEAD Tales From Beyond The Pale Glass Eye Pix Comix SUDDEN STORM: A Wendigo Reader, paperbound book curated by Larry Fessenden Satan Hates You Trigger Man Automatons THE ROOST THE LAST WINTER WENDIGO HABIT No Telling / The Frankenstein Complex Impact Addict Videos
July 7, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Gizmodo: “The Last Winter an especially effective terror-in-isolation tale.”

Bundle Up With These 18 Horror Movies Set In The Freezing Cold

#3 The Last winter

Things start going very, very wrong for a group of Arctic oil drillers in Larry Fessenden’s cult thriller — but is it due to a natural causes… or supernatural ones? Inevitably, the survivors begin to turn on each other with increasing fervour as the Earth itself seems to start claiming lives, but intriguing characters (played by Ron Perlman, James LeGros, Connie Britton and others) and a unique plot make The Last Winter an especially effective terror-in-isolation tale.

Check out the full list

 

July 2, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Glass Eye titles make the cut: 13 Unsung Independent Horror Flicks

From CHILLERtv.com:

Glass Eye Pix classix I SELL THE DEAD (Glenn McQuaid) and THE LAST WINTER (Fessenden)
celebrated in Tony Timpone’s list of 13 Unsung Independent Horror Flicks.

Also listed: Jim Mickle’s feature MULBERRY STREET which features Fessenden torn apart by rats,
and ZOMBIE HONEYMOON by Dave Gebroe, executive produced by Fessenden.

6. I Sell the Dead (2008)

This marvelously macabre horror film tags along with a pair of 18th century grave robbers (Lost’s Dominic Monaghan and Larry Fessenden, who also produced). Dublin-born director Glenn McQuaid discusses his film’s origins: “In the late ’70s and early ’80s, BBC2 ran a series of horror double bills every Saturday night. They covered the classics from Universal, RKO and Hammer, but also peppered the programming with some fairly (at the time) obscure and more contemporary films like The Craziesand Race with the Devil. This collection was really my first experience of horror, and it left a very strong impression on me.

“When I wrote I Sell the Dead, I wanted to reach back to those movies and make something that would sit well alongside them,” adds McQuaid, currently pitching a new horror yarn called The Restoration at Grayson Manor. “Folks like Freddie Francis, Terence Fisher and Val Lewton are very much an influence on the world I created. I also love cemeteries, and, in a way, I Sell the Dead is a love letter to them.”

7. The Last Winter (2006)

Speaking of producer Larry Fessenden, the man who serves as the indie world’s best friend also directs movies of his own. Starring Ron Perlman and James Le Gross, this prescient horror picture deals with an environmental nightmare in the Arctic. “I wanted to show two men out in the unforgiving wilderness where one has knowledge of the land and the other has all the bravado but is suddenly vulnerable,” explains Fessenden. “There is a Kurosawa movie called Dersu Uzala that captures that vibe, which had some influence. And more than with my previous film Wendigo, The Last Winter was inspired by the writings of Algernon Blackwood, who so uniquely evokes the uncanny. I was worried about climate change when I made the film; I wanted to show how scary it would be if everyone just kept ignoring the warnings and acting as if nothing was wrong—to me that seemed like a world gone mad…and that was in 2005!”

SEE WHOLE LIST HERE

 

June 28, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Cutting Room #86 – New York in the 70’s

June 26, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Fessenden’s THE LAST WINTER unspools at MOMA this summer in series celebrating “the uncanny”

From TIME OUT NY:

MoMA is screening 70 amazing science fiction films this summer

Fans of sci-fi haven’t had a particularly great go of it this year, what with Scarlett Johansson’s Ghost in the Shell leaving bad tastes in our mouths and the fifth Transformers entry, The Last Knight, inducing vertigo. 

But it looks like our luck is about to change this summer: MoMA just announced “Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction,” an enormous showcase of more than 70 films made from 1901–2017. With a prompt of “what does it mean to be human?” the fest will only showcase movies set on Earth in the present or quasi-present, so all of your space-faring favorites are out. I know, I know: I was hoping to watch Dune at MoMA too. 

Opening on July 17 and running through August 31, the series will screen films from more than 22 countries, and features intros from filmmaker fans like Larry Fessenden, Lynn Hershman Leeson and John Sayles. Neil deGrasse Tyson will be on hand on July 14 to introduce The Quiet Earth.

There are too many features to list here, but some notable pics include Invasión (1969)Die letzten Tage von Gomorrha (The Last Days of Gomorrah) (1974), Fata Morgana (1971), Gattaca (1997), Children of Men (2006), Ex Machina (2014) and Marjorie Prime (2017)

You can check out the full lineup here

June 20, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND to be released by Orion Pictures and Samuel Goldwyn Films

Orion Pictures and Samuel Goldwyn Films have acquired North American rights to Most Beautiful Island, a psychological thriller from Glass Eye Pix directed, written, produced by and starring Ana Asensio. It won a Grand Jury Award in the narrative competition at SXSW this year.

Shot on Super 16mm, the pic chronicles one harrowing day in the life of Luciana, a young immigrant woman struggling to make ends meet in New York while striving to escape her past. As Luciana’s day unfolds, she is whisked through a series of troublesome and unforeseeable extremes. Before her day is done, she inadvertently finds herself a central participant in a cruel game where lives are placed at risk, and psyches are twisted and broken for the perverse entertainment of a privileged few.

Natasha Romanova, David Little, Nicholas Tucci, Larry Fessenden and Caprice Benedetti co-star. Jenn Wexler, Chadd Harbold, Fessenden and Noah Greenberg produced, and Peter Phok, Jose María Garcia, Ahmet Bilgen, Selim Cevikel, Christohper Todd and Gill Holland are executive producers.

The deal was negotiated by Peter Goldwyn on behalf of Samuel Goldwyn and Andrew Herwitz and Lucas Verga of Film Sales Corp. on behalf of the filmmakers. It comes ahead of the film’s bow Wednesday at BAM Cinemafest.

Check out the article…

June 16, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Kelly Reichardt’s CERTAIN WOMEN out on Criterion September 19

Fessenden continues long-standing collaboration with auteur Kelly Reichardt, serving as Executive Producer on her recent work Certain Women, out on DVD and Blu-ray this Fall. From indiewire:

“Certain Women”

“The expanses of the American Northwest take center stage in this intimately observed triptych from Kelly Reichardt. Adapted from three short stories by Maile Meloy and unfolding in self-contained but interlocking episodes, Certain Women navigates the subtle shifts in personal desire and social expectation that unsettle the circumscribed lives of its characters: a lawyer (Laura Dern) forced to subdue a troubled client; a woman (Michelle Williams) whose plans to construct her dream home reveal fissures in her marriage; and a night-school teacher (Kristen Stewart) who forms a tenuous bond with a lonely ranch hand (Lily Gladstone), whose unguardedness and deep attachment to the land deliver an unexpected jolt of emotional immediacy. With unassuming craft, Reichardt captures the rhythms of daily life in small-town Montana through these fine-grained portraits of women trapped within the landscape’s wide-open spaces.”

June 16, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Pinnland presents: The cinema of Kelly Reichardt told through images and stills

I don’t know if I could come up with my own personal list of today’s top American filmmakers right now (too many of them are too inconsistent, inactive or new these days), but if Kelly Reichardt were one of the names on someone else’s list, I wouldn’t be mad at that. These days when I think of “American Cinema”, I think of stuff like Old Joy. In the last 8 years, Kelly Reichardt has explored everything from poverty (Wendy & Lucy) & “eco-terrorism” (Night Moves) to this country’s history (Meek’s Cutoff) & the importance of friendship (Old Joy). And what’s so great is that she touches on all these topics in a subtle/non-preachy way. Kelly Reichardt has been one of the true MVP’s this year here at PINNLAND EMPIRE so it’s only right that we explore her filmography.
June 15, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

IndieWire: MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND one of 20 movies that define this year in cinema

From Indiewire:

Ana Asensio’s SXSW winner burst onto the scene when it bowed at the festival back in March, and as it hits BAM and readies for a theatrical rollout, the timely feature will likely only garner more well-deserved attention. Our review explained, “Asensio, a thirtysomething Spanish actress whose work is virtually unseen on these shores, not only wrote, directed, and produced this fraught metropolitan thriller, she also appears in just about every frame. And while the film might begin by suggesting that its heroine was chosen at random (a mesmeric prologue follows seven different women as they weave through the sidewalks of Manhattan, the camera picking them out of a crowd as if to wordlessly reassert that most of the Naked City’s seven million stories remain untold), Asensio’s compulsively watchable lead performance splits the difference between the specific and the representational.”

See it at the NY premiere at the BAM Cinema Fest this Wednesday 6/21. Tix on sale!

June 13, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Cutting Room #85 – Brazil

June 13, 2017
Share:
Facebook Twitter Email

Supermassive Games to release HIDDEN AGENDA

From The Verge:

One of my favorite PS4 games is Until Dawn, Supermassive’s cinematic horror adventure from 2015. The game took Heavy Rain’s branching story structure and applied it to a self-aware slasher tale, which felt like a much more natural fit — even if you made the wrong call and let a character die in an gory instant, the story would just keep going. And though it was a single-player game by design, it turned out to work really well with a bunch of people on a sofa yelling frantic instructions to the player. For Supermassive’s next game, the British studio is expanding on that idea. Hidden Agenda is a new narrative-driven PS4 crime thriller that’s designed to be played with multiple players collaborating on the characters’ decisions and actions. The really neat step is that each person uses their smartphone as a controller, letting them vote on options and act on information that may not be available to everyone else.