GLASS EYE PIX Sizzle Reel The Larry Fessenden Collection The Ranger LIKE ME PSYCHOPATHS MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND Stake Land II STRAY BULLETS Darling ABCs of Death 2: N is for NEXUS Until Dawn Until Dawn: Rush of Blood LATE PHASES How Jesus Took America Hostage — “American Jesus” the Movie New Doc BIRTH OF THE LIVING DEAD Explores the Impact of the Ground-Breaking Horror Film NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD BENEATH THE COMEDY THE INNKEEPERS HYPOTHERMIA STAKE LAND BITTER FEAST THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL I CAN SEE YOU WENDY & LUCY Liberty Kid I SELL THE DEAD Tales From Beyond The Pale Glass Eye Pix Comix SUDDEN STORM: A Wendigo Reader, paperbound book curated by Larry Fessenden Satan Hates You Trigger Man Automatons THE ROOST THE LAST WINTER WENDIGO HABIT No Telling / The Frankenstein Complex Impact Addict Videos
December 30, 2017
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FILMMAKER MAGAZINE: Top Ten Films Directed/Co-Directed by Women of 2017

From Filmmaker Magazine: by   Dec 29, 2017

Many might see 2017 as a tumultuous year for women in film, but it wasn’t. I see it as the year that women in the industry began the long journey towards ending the tumult, starting with the huge artistic risks they have taken in their work. Each film I chose for this list holds a purely individual voice, each voice starting a conversation about the future of not just women in film but the future of film as a whole. 2017 was only the beginning of hearing our stories, and we have a lot more to say…

1. Most Beautiful Island
Luciana, an undocumented immigrant, flees her homeland after a tragic accident, thrown into a sea of New York bodies churning for a better life. Regulated to Craigslist gigs, she finds herself descending into a Manhattan basement where a chilling, high-stakes game of terror unfolds. Loosely based on true events experienced by writer, director, actress Ana Asensio with hints of Polanski’s Repulsion and the highest class of B movie/social-issue thriller (think Get Out), the film hovers in a strange space of the wildly fantastic but also asphixatingly real. The garishness of the crowded streets, the saturated Super 16mm film and the somewhat overblown characters give the film a reserved cartoonish-ness that makes it even more sinister when darkness looms. The unmoored life of an illegal immigrant in the United States striving, yearning, trusting and hoping that things can improve is laid bare in this eerie narrative delivered with utmost control and perfectly sustained suspense. Winner of the SXSW Grand Jury prize for narrative feature, it is a balanced, relevant film that captures a strange unease that will forever remain synonymous with 2017.

Read whole article

December 27, 2017
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Entertainment Weekly: Watch the exclusive trailer for psychedelic thriller LIKE ME

From Entertainment Weekly:

In the new SXSW-screened thriller Like Me (out Jan. 26), Addison Timlin (Little Sister) plays a reckless loner who sets out on a crime spree that she broadcasts on social media. After releasing a video of herself robbing a convenience store, she amasses a huge following. While traveling along the coast, she encounters a drifter, an Internet troll, and a paint huffing outsider who are all pulled into her circle of chaos, junk food, and drugs.

Like Me is written and directed by first-time filmmaker Robert Mockler. The movie is executive-produced by indie-horror legend Larry Fessenden, whose own movies include 1995’s Habit and The Last Winter and who also costars in Like Me.

Like Me arrives in theaters on Jan. 26. Watch the exclusive trailer for Mockler’s film.

December 25, 2017
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Dead Air Podcast dissects THE LAST WINTER

December 24, 2017
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Oldie But Goodie Dept: “You Better Watch Out…”

December 21, 2017
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LIKE ME by Robert Mockler — Coming to cinemas JAN & VOD FEB from Kino Lorber

ALL THE LATEST NEWS ON LIKE ME IS AT LIKEMEMOVIE.COM

 

December 21, 2017
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PSYCHOPATHS available on VOD Jan 2 / Fessenden and Keating on Trunkspace

From TrunkSpace:

Chilling Out is where TrunkSpace talks all things horror and genre with those who work in the projects that give us the thrills and chills to keep coming back for more. This time out we’re chatting with horror icon Larry Fessenden, actor and CEO of Glass Eye Pix, whose latest film, “Psychopaths,” arrives on digital home entertainment January 2.

We recently sat down with Fessenden to discuss his creative simpatico with director Mickey Keating, why he loves working in genre films, and how he became an unexpected legend to fans of horror filmmaking.

Read whole interview here

Read the TrunkSpace Interview with Psychopaths director here

December 20, 2017
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NY TIMES: “Video Game Creators Seek Out Hollywood for Robust Narratives”

Reznick and Fessenden highlighted in New York Times article
on video game writing by Laura Parker published 12.20.17

Supermassive Games, the maker of Until Dawn (shown here),
hired the screenwriter and director Larry Fessenden to develop the game’s story.

From the article:

When Pete Samuels, a founder and the chief executive of Supermassive Games, began working on a survival horror adventure video game called Until Dawn in 2015, he knew he wanted the story to unfold like that of a horror film.

So he turned to Hollywood. Mr. Samuels sought out Larry Fessenden, an American screenwriter and director whose credits include the horror films “Wendigo” and “The Last Winter,” and the screenplay for “Orphanage,” an in-development English language remake of the Spanish horror film “El Orfanato” from the director Guillermo del Toro.

“The gaming audience is growing, and tastes are broadening,” Mr. Samuels said. “Great films and great television that tell good stories are more widely available to many more people than ever before, and there’s definitely an increasing population of the gaming audience that are enthusiastic for games with a thoughtfully constructed narrative.”

For now, building robust and dynamic stories can still be difficult, especially in games that have several outcomes depending on what each player decides. When developing the story for Until Dawn, for example, Mr. Fessenden worked with a collaborator, the writer and director Graham Reznick, whose credits include the 2008 experimental horror feature film “I Can See You.” Together, they crafted a creepy cabin-in-the-woods story focused on a group of teenagers.

The game was conceived as a first-person game, which Mr. Reznick said felt “much less cinematic.” Supermassive Games then decided to switch to a third-person perspective, and began employing techniques usually reserved for films, like fixed camera angles, editing between shots, and high resolution facial capture for the actors.

“This let us actually write dialogue and express ideas closer to how we would in film — a loaded glance in a cutaway could be much more powerful than a line of dialogue shouted from offscreen,” Mr. Reznick said.

In the game’s final version, players can alternate among characters during the game, making decisions that affect the outcome. The game, which features the voices and likeness of the actors Rami Malek and Hayden Panettiere, was released on the PlayStation 4 in 2015. It later won a British Academy of Film and Television Arts award for its originality.

Read whole article at the NY Times

December 20, 2017
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Tis the season: Fessenden’s SANTA CLAWS! Happy holidays!

Head on over to Beck Underwood’s Creepy Christmas for more Yule Tide fun.

December 14, 2017
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BLOODY DISGUSTING: Doug Jones’ 10 Memorable roles include Fessenden’s SKIN AND BONES

Not THAT Doug Jones, OUR Doug Jones! Fessenden honored to be featured in this article about the fantastic Doug Jones with a nice blurb about SKIN AND BONES (and a photo in the headliner!) Jones currently slithering (and scoring!) in THE SHAPE OF WATER by GDT.

 

FROM THE ARTICLE by Meagan Navarro:

Actor and contortionist Doug Jones is currently generating Oscar buzz for his performance as Amphibian Man in Guillermo del Toro’s latest, The Shape of Water. Like most of his roles, Jones is unrecognizable as the otherworldly creature bearing resemblance to the titular character from Creature of the Black Lagoon. Through heavy makeup and prosthetics, Jones is able to convey a depth of emotion with his movement and body language alone. His uncanny knack for physical acting is something very few actors can even hold a candle to, which is why the actor has a long history of bringing unique characters to life on screen, both big and small.  His tall, lean frame lends a striking silhouette and presence, but his use of his expressive hands demonstrates why he’s not just a perennial favorite of del Toro’s, but a go-to actor for extraordinary character work.

Fear Itself (“Skin and Bones”) – Grady Edlund

This short-lived, underrated horror anthology series was derailed by the 2008 Summer Olympics, which is a shame, because Doug Jones’ work in the episode Skin and Bones was pure nightmare fuel. The episode is directed by Larry Fessenden, a director with a history of exploring Wendigo folklore, and between his execution of building suspense and Jones’ alternating between sympathy and downright ominous cruelty, Skin and Bones is one of the best hours of television ever. As the emaciated Grady, who returns after disappearing into the mountains with a group of men days ago, Jones delivers some of the most nail-biting scenes ever, like the chilling scene where he licks his wife Helen’s arm while she’s trying to feed him back to health. Jones may look like a frail skeleton in this role, but he exudes evil power.

Read the whole list here!

December 14, 2017
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Stray Bullets among pictures cited in celebration of Hudson Valley Film Production

From the Upstater:

It’s no secret that the Hudson Valley is home to countless Hollywood movie stars and producers—its lush and beautiful landscapes and proximity to New York City providing the best of both worlds. Though a handful of films have showcased the area over the decades, its cinematic footprint paled in comparison to other regions due to a flawed state program that didn’t consider the Hudson Valley “upstate.”

But that’s all changing. Last year, after significant advocacy from Ulster County Executive Mike Hein, New York State passed legislation allowing Ulster County and a handful of other left-behinds to finally compete for productions by offering the same 40-percent tax credit allotted to the rest of upstate New York. The legislation was signed by the governor in November 2016, and as a result, the entire Mid-Hudson region is now included and will benefit.

Recent months have seen Ulster County evolving into a hotbed for major movie productions…

Stray Bullets (2017)
Written and directed by 16-year-old wunderkind Jack Fessenden (with a little help from his father, veteran indie filmmaker Larry Fessenden), Stray Bullets follows two teenage boys who accidentally collide with a group of armed robbers on the run. Filmed across Ulster County, in Stone Ridge, Rosendale, Kingston, Woodstock and West Shokan.

Read full article here