GLASS EYE PIX Sizzle Reel The Larry Fessenden Collection DEPRAVED ABCs of Death 2: N is for NEXUS BENEATH Skin And Bones THE LAST WINTER WENDIGO HABIT No Telling / The Frankenstein Complex Until Dawn Until Dawn: Rush of Blood The Ranger LIKE ME PSYCHOPATHS MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND Stake Land II STRAY BULLETS Darling LATE PHASES How Jesus Took America Hostage — “American Jesus” the Movie New Doc BIRTH OF THE LIVING DEAD Explores the Impact of the Ground-Breaking Horror Film NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD THE COMEDY THE INNKEEPERS HYPOTHERMIA STAKE LAND BITTER FEAST THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL I CAN SEE YOU WENDY & LUCY Liberty Kid I SELL THE DEAD Tales From Beyond The Pale Glass Eye Pix Comix SUDDEN STORM: A Wendigo Reader, paperbound book curated by Larry Fessenden Satan Hates You Trigger Man Automatons THE ROOST Impact Addict Videos
April 23, 2019
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Eric Pennycoff has SADISTIC INTENTIONS

The film by GEP pal Eric Pennycoff is making the rounds at festivals and stars
Jeremy Gardner and Taylor Zaudtke, 
first seen together in Chris Skotchdopole’s
The EGG and The HATCHET.

From The Farsighted Blog: “The only other credited actor in the film is Larry Fessenden, whose role is somewhat meaningful, albeit very small. He’s called “homeowner” on the film’s IMDB, so let’s suffice it to say he’s the head of his household (an inside joke only those who have seen the film will understand, but my inner dad wouldn’t allow me to let the opportunity for a good dad jokes to go by unused or underutilized).”

See full blog HERE

April 22, 2019
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EARTH DAY 2019

April 19, 2019
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Weekends with GEP: Stake Land 2

Streaming on Netflix

April 18, 2019
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TBT: The Egg and The Hatchet

2015, Jeremy Gardner and Taylor Zaudtke on set of THE EGG AND THE HATCHET,
a short film directed by Chris Skotchdopole.

April 14, 2019
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GEP pal Jesse Locascio in NYT

GEP stalwart Jesse Locascio (Camera AC on LATE PHASES, PRANKS, STRAY BULLETS, THE RANGER, LIKE ME, DEPRAVED) featured in New York Times article celebrating the art of the film projectionist:

For the 9:20 p.m. movie, Jesse Locascio threaded film through the projector. This was after he had sprayed compressed air on the sprockets and rollers, blowing out dust that could show up as black dots on the screen.

“This is not how they do it at the multiplex,” he said. “Not even close.”

Not in the digital age.

Mr. Locascio, 28, is a movie projectionist who can do things the old-fashioned way, operating projectors with big reels of celluloid. Projectionists, he says, are a dying breed and he learned much of what he knows in a long, narrow room of clattering machinery: a projectionist’s booth at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville, N.Y.

The Jacob Burns, as it is known, operates a media arts lab that teaches digital literacy as well as a nonprofit art house that was screening “Where’s Poppa?” — a 1970 comedy directed by Carl Reiner — at 9:20 in theater two. But it also trains projectionists, and in an art house, that means learning to handle more than digital files.

It means learning to handle celluloid.

“It was a whole new education,” said Jesse Modica, who as the center’s technical director is Mr. Locascio’s boss. Mr. Modica had worked in commercial theaters before he arrived at the Jacob Burns in 2007.

“My previous training didn’t include any of the nuances,” he said, but he learned from the projectionists at the Jacob Burns. And now Mr. Modica trains newcomers like Mr. Locascio in the mechanics of showing film.

Training a projectionist is “like giving somebody private lessons,” Mr. Modica said. “A lot of this is muscle memory. Once I teach someone, ‘O.K., this is how you inspect the film, this is how you get the sound to work, this is how you make sure you’ve got the right aspect ratio,’ they’ve got to remember come showtime. It’s like someone taking karate. You can learn all the karate you want in the dojo, but are you going to remember when you’re being attacked in an alley?”

Read Whole Article HERE

April 12, 2019
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Weekends with GEP: Graham Reznick’s DEADWAX

While you wait for your Holy Mountain Printing exclusive vinyl of THE GRANDFATHER
to arrive in the mail, why don’t you binge watch Graham Reznick’s masterwork DEADWAX.
Now streaming on Shudder.

April 12, 2019
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Tales From Beyond The Pale: THE GRANDFATHER now on Vinyl LP! A Holy Mountain exclusive

Our pals at Holy Mountain Printing release vinyl of
Graham Reznick’s THE GRANDFATHER, featuring Angus Scrimm.
 Available on glow in the dark or split blue/green 12″ vinyl.
This release is limited to a total of 500 pieces. 

Pre Order NOW!

April 12, 2019
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Slash Film: WENDIGO “The Best Movies Streaming Right Now”

Wendigo Now Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

If you saw the new Pet Sematary, and were intrigued by the legend of the Wendigo that’s mentioned briefly in the film, you might want to check out Larry Fessenden‘s Wendigo. A low-budget affair, Fessenden knows exactly how to stretch his budget and create an effective, creepy chiller. Jake WeberPatricia Clarkson and Erik Peter Sullivan play a family who decide to take a vacation from Manhattan and head to a cabin in heavily wooded upstate New York. The trip runs into trouble almost immediately, when the family runs afoul of a group of rude, confrontational hunters. Once everyone gets to the cabin, things only get weirder, as some sort of malevolent presence seems to be lurking about. Is it all in the heads of the characters, or is there something supernatural afoot? You decide.

See Full List HERE

April 11, 2019
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TBT: We Are Still Here

2015, Fessenden, Barbara Crampton, Andrew Sensenig, Lisa Marie and
director Ted Geoghegan on set of WE ARE STILL HERE.

April 11, 2019
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PopHorror: Review Of Larry Fessenden’s Contemporary Frankenstein Tale

From PopHorror: “In Depraved, we get a look at Frankenstein’s monster in the way that Mary Shelley always envisioned… a desolate, confused creation rebuilt out of other people’s parts that only reacted to what he had learned in his short, miserable life…

… On the surface, the film is about a broken doctor named Henry (Call) who gets in over his head after agreeing to try out his friend, Polidori’s (Leonard), reanimation drugs on what is essentially a pieced together cadaver. He has this being before him that he is pressured to teach the most basic bodily functions and how to respond in society, all in the quickest way possible. Imagine being in his situation, one of responsibility and doubt, pressured to do more by his peers but feeling deep sympathy and even love for his subject.

But dig deeper and you find the tale of a paradigm who has no one in the world that he can relate to. Adam (Breaux) has memories of things he never did and people he’s never met. He looks in the mirror and sees a shattered face – both literally and figuratively – that he does not recognize. His body is pieced together, and not one of those pieces are originally his. Adam is a full grown man who has no control of his bodily functions or even the simplest tasks, like a newborn baby in a man’s body. He was never born; he just became. His wretched heart knows no mother or father, no name or identity. If you’re made up of other people’s parts, who are you? Is the brain in your head even yours? Do you even have a soul?

Read Full Review HERE