June 21, 2016
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More on the Secretly Shot STAKELANDER

From Bloody Disgusting:

Dark Sky Secretly Filmed a Sequel to STAKE LAND and It’s Called THE STAKELANDER

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Dark Sky Films, Glass Eye Pix and Syfy today announced the completion of production on The Stakelander, the eagerly anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed action horror hit Stake Land.

The film, based on an original screenplay by Nick Damici, wrapped shooting in Saskatchewan this past week. Damici and co-star Connor Paolo reprise their Stake Land roles in the new film, which was directed by the team of Dan Berk and Robert Olsen of Last Pictures, creators of the 2015 thriller Body.

Damici, co-writer and star of We Are What We Are and Cold in July, returns in the role of Mister and Connor Paolo (Mystic River, TV’s Revenge) is back as Martin in a new adventure set a few years after the events in Stake Land, in which mankind must struggle to survive in the wake of a vampire apocalypse. Also starring are Laura Abramsen (Basic Human Needs), AC Peterson (Shooter), Bonnie Dennison (Beneath)Kristina Hughes (Green River) and Steven Williams (TV’s Supernatural).

The Stakelander was produced by Peter Phok and Larry Fessenden of Glass Eye Pix, Greg Newman of Dark Sky Films and co-produced by the Syfy Channel, where the film will premiere as a Syfy Original, as well as Mark Montague of Berkserker Entertainment. Chadd Harbold of Last Pictures supported as Associate Producer. The film marks the latest collaboration between Dark Sky Films and Glass Eye Pix, the production teams that have brought audiences countless successful elevated genre films, including Stake Land, The House of the Devil, The Innkeepers and Late Phases, among others.

Check out the full coverage at Bloody-Disgusting.com.

June 21, 2016
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TALES wins at New York Festival’s Radio Program Awards

TALES FROM BEYOND THE PALE wins the Silver Radio Award for Best Regularly Scheduled Drama Program at the 2016 New York Festival’s International Radio Program Awards! Co-creator Glenn McQuaid was in attendance, accepting the award. Check out the pics here, then listen to TALES at TalesFromBeyondThePale.com!

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June 14, 2016
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Mind’s Eye trailer unleashed!

The hypnotic, mind-melting trailer for Joe Begos’ new film The Mind’s Eye has finally arrived! The cast consists of a few familiar faces such as Graham Skipper, Noah Segan, Matt Mercer, Jeremy Gardner, Brian Morvant, Josh Ethier, Sam Zimmerman and Glass Eye pals Lauren Ashley Carter, John Speredakos and GEP madman Larry Fessenden!   Screen Shot 2016-06-14 at 5.14.55 PM

Read full article here.

June 8, 2016
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Introducing: the first-ever Shudder Labs Fellows!

Back in February, we told you about Shudder Labs, a new program from the horror-specific streaming service—which is still quite new itself, having launched last summer—designed to help up-and-coming horror filmmakers launch their careers by introducing them to mentors with experience serving in the horror trenches. Since then, the Masters-In-Residence for the program have been announced—Habit director and ubiquitous indie-horror actor Larry Fessenden, The Boy writer Clay McLeod Chapman, Darling producer Jenn Wexler, SFX artists Josh and Sierra Russell, and more—but we’ve yet to hear about the lucky fellows themselves.
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May 21, 2016
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Extended Cuts: RIVER OF GRASS interview, cont.

Extended chat with Fessenden on the River of Grass shoot and restoration
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May 18, 2016
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Larry Fessenden flaps his gums about indie auteur Kelly Reichardt

“Kelly is very warm and very loyal with a select few people,” he answers. “She’s just a private person. She believes in the work first, and is a little wary of the pomp and circumstance of press, and even for that matter talking about her work and her motivations.”

Fessenden, for his own part, has “never been shy” when it comes to interviews, but thinks there’s room for more than one approach. “You have the Hitchcock model; I think he was incredibly articulate, and brought a great deal to cinema by talking about his process. But there’s also Kubrick, who stopped doing interviews right when he became most intriguing, and as a result, his films are deeply haunting.”

Reichardt might lean towards the latter extreme, but, Fessenden concludes, that’s “extremely charming in this day in age, where everybody is flappin’ their gums at every opportunity!”

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Read full article HERE

BUY River of Grass on Blu Ray and DVD

May 18, 2016
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Dread Central takes a look at SOUTHBOUND

Southbound is thankfully cinematic and well-acted.

Here’s how it unfolds: Through the soothing sounds of a radio DJ (voiced in velvet and sandpaper by Larry Fessenden), we learn of a place that lies just south of here. It’s a small town in the middle of nowhere consisting of a gas station, a diner, a hospital, and a few derelict structures that can’t be identified at a glance. There are some neighborhoods, too, but believe me: You wouldn’t want to live there. Or die there, which is what most people do.

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May 14, 2016
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THR: TRANSFIGURATION Cannes Review

The Hollywood Reporter reviews GEP friends’ THE TRANSFIGURATION:

An orphaned African-American teen leads a secret life fed by vampire lore in Michael O’Shea’s indie debut, premiering at Cannes in Un Certain Regard.

Wide-ranging references to vampire mythology in literature and cinema are scattered throughout writer-director Michael O’Shea’s low-key but absorbing first feature, The Transfiguration. But what distinguishes this stripped-down anti-horror film — set amid the housing projects and lonely beachfronts of the Rockaways in Queens, New York — is its absence of the supernatural. While death by bloodsucking is very much a factor, this is actually a subdued, contemplative drama about the lingering trauma of grief and the efforts of an introspective teenager to invent an invulnerable persona to shield and ultimately release him.

….

In an insider nod to horror fans, Lloyd Kaufman and Larry Fessenden make brief appearances in ill-fated encounters with Milo. The bloodletting here is a million miles away from the cartoonish schlock violence of Kaufman’s Troma brand, but not entirely unrelated to some of Fessenden’s low-budget early horror films, with their focus on human psychology and social milieu over traditional genre elements. Fessenden’s long association with Kelly Reichardt as a producer also is relevant, given the acknowledged influence here of that filmmaker’s minimalist realism.

O’Shea uses the bursts of droning ambient noise and the somber electronic sounds of Margaret Chardiet’s score to arresting effect. But he’s less interested in creating suspense or pumping up atmosphere than in exploring the ways in which horror, and its intoxicating relationship with death, can be a paradoxical balm for the more earthly cruelties of life. That makes The Transfiguration a difficult movie to classify, but one with an emotional depth that creeps up on you.

Check out the full review at HollywoodReporter.com

May 13, 2016
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Fessenden guest stars on sax w/ the Wharton Tiers Ensemble this Sunday

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April 22, 2016
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Earth Day with GEP

Delve into the mind of an individual who is pissed off at the hubris of humanity.
Check out the many ecologically-themed works of Larry Fessenden.

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