October 12, 2018
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Weekends with GEP: Beneath

This weekend, come to the world premiere of Michael Vincent’s
ONLY A SWITCH at the Woodstock Film Festival! Tickets available now!

But if you’re stuck at home for the weekend, then revisit Fessenden’s creature-feature BENEATH,
available for digital download on iTunes. 

Rent or Buy on iTunes

Tix for ONLY A SWITCH

October 8, 2018
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Comic Con 2018

Glass Eye Pix booth at Comic Con NYC, Oct 4-7, 2018!
Music by Fall On Your Sword from
Fessenden’s BENEATH
April 22, 2016
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Earth Day with GEP

Delve into the mind of an individual who is pissed off at the hubris of humanity.
Check out the many ecologically-themed works of Larry Fessenden.

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April 8, 2015
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LISTEN UP TORONTO! Head over to The Black Museum Tonight!

BlackMuseum
APRIL 8, 2015
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: THE FILMS OF LARRY FESSENDEN
As a film director, Larry Fessenden has crafted several of the most indelible and idiosyncratic horror movies of the last 25 years, from the urban vampire tale Habit to the visionary and environmental apocalypse of The Last Winter. But he’s also had a major impact on the independent filmmaking landscape as a producer of genre films, including the work of Ti West, as well as via his collaboration with the acclaimed writer-director Kelly Reichardt, who cast Fessenden as the uneasy-riding star of her breakthrough road movie River of Grass. As Fessenden’s Glass eye Pix production company celebrates its 30th anniversary in 2015, the time seems right to survey the career of a brilliantly expressive filmmaker whose clever, palpably handcrafted films honor the noble B-movie tradition of tackling social issues without sacrificing scares. This lecture, specially created for The Black Museum, will weave together critical commentary with clips from Fessenden’s films, including his recent killer-catfish film Beneath.

April 8, 2015 at 9:15pm
The Royal Cinema, 608 College St, Toronto
Cost: $12 advance / $15 at the door

Buy Tickets

LECTURER: ADAM NAYMAN
Adam Nayman is a film critic in Toronto and a contributing editor to Cinema Scope. His writing has appeared in The Walrus, the Globe and Mail, the National Post, Reverse Shot and the Village Voice, and he teaches Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto. His first book, It Doesn’ Suck: Showgirls, was published in 2014 by ECW Press

December 13, 2014
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Santa is Coming to Town…

SantaIsComing

As Santa-Con kicks off in NYC and the fat man readies himself for his big night, you might want to think about whether you’ve been naughty or nice this year…

Glass Eye Pal Will Bates of Fall On Your Sword and composer of Fessenden’s BENEATH, delights with his annual Christmas Audio Offering Santa is Coming to Town b/w White Christmas… Available on iTunes,  streaming on youtube and in a limited vinyl edition.

There’s just something a little off about that Santa…
 

December 8, 2014
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Larry Fessenden, “Patron Saint of Horror”

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Check it! The Montana Mancave Massacre’s got a blog post up all about Fessenden and the films he’s directed, produced and acted in.

Some snippets from the post…

“When I was making my list of films to include…films either directed by or starring Larry Fessenden were taking up a lot of real estate. It was damned nigh impossible to choose between them, so I decided to lump them all together. So here’s you’re gift for the 6th day of Christmas: the majesty that is Larry Fessenden.”

“As the founder of Glass Eye Pix, his philosophy of filmmaking is that you don’t need a massive budget or big star to make a great film. Since 1985, Glass Eye Pix has been producing great indie flicks by auteur directors, especially young horror directors. In short, Larry Fessenden is doing God’s Work.”

“This man is essential to modern horror.”

“Habit is a story of newfound love in a particularly difficult time in one man’s life…it’s a hell of a great vampire film. And it’s one of the rare instances in which Fessenden plays the lead character. And he’s great. He’s got a slovenly charm about him that makes you understand why the vampire character is fascinated by him. Watching Habit, it’s difficult to understand why he didn’t become a more prominent actor. Dude’s got the goods.”

“Wendigo is a micro-budget masterpiece…This is a labor of love, and it shows.”

“The Last Winter is, as far as I know, the first environmental horror movie. It tackles the question (as does Wendigo, to a lesser extent) how does nature fight back when humans violate its balance?”

“And on one last note, if you’re still unconvinced of Larry Fessenden’s awesomeness, he also produces a web-based horror-themed radio drama series named Tales From Beyond the Pale. If any of you are into Arch Oboler’s Lights Out or the old Rod Serling radio plays, Fessenden is the man bring that stuff back. Each episode boasts a celebrity cast and a name author. Sir Lawrence, you just put everyone else to shame.”

Check out the original post right here!

 

 

April 11, 2014
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Horror Movie Podcast Show – Fessenden Retrospective

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From HMPod.com:

“One of the busiest dudes working in the horror genre, Larry Fessenden is an actor, writer, director & producer. On this special episode of The Horror Movie Show, hosts Jerry & Mark wax rhapsodic about several of Larry’s movies.

Three movies in which Larry acts — Jug FaceYou’re Next & We Are What We Are — madeHMPod‘s Top 10 list for 2013. A brief review of each movie begins this retrospective.

As producer & director, Larry’s new flick Beneath is a good, old-fashioned creature feature about a gigantic hungry fish in a very small pond, feasting upon the disloyal bodies of naughty teenagers. Larry’s production studio, Glass Eye Pix, has made at least one movie that is not horror, but will make some viewers squirm regardless. The Comedy is the sort of movie that divides an audience into those who love it & those who loathe it.

I Sell the Dead, starring Larry & loveable Dominic Monaghan (The Lord of the RingsLost), is a blackly comic tale of body-snatching ghouls who are in way over their heads, so to speak.

Two more movies directed & written by Larry wrap up this episode. The Last Winter (2006) is a tale of nature’s revenge on shortsighted humanity, with Ron Perlman playing the sort of swine he plays so well. Wendigo (2001) stars Jake Weber & Patricia Clarkson as nice people caught up in a small-town cretin’s anger.

Expect to see HMPod‘s interview with Larry, exclusive to this site & Eli Roth‘s The Crypt, coming soon.”

Listen to the podcast here!

March 27, 2014
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Daily Dead on Beneath

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From Derek Anderson at Daily Dead:

They thought they were friends. A man-eating fish proved them wrong. In director Larry Fessenden’sBeneath, six recently graduated high school friends cross paths with a massive, sharp-toothed fish on the secluded Black Lake. Confronted with a life-or-death situation, the teens discover how weak their bond really is as tempers rise, panic sets in, and the fish opens its jaws for the next meal.

Warned not to go out on Black Lake by family friend Mr. Parks (Mark Margolis), Johnny (Daniel Zovatto) leads his pack of pals out on the water one morning, anyway, figuring they’ll just cross to the other side in their rowboat. Besides, this is his big chance to reconnect with ex-girlfriend Kitty (Bonnie Dennison), even though her alpha male current boyfriend Matt (Chris Conroy) is along for the ride. Matt’s academic scholarship-receiving brother Simon (Jonny Orsini) also pines for Kitty, while sporty Deb (Mackenzie Rosman) just wants to make some final lasting memories with the gang. Aspiring filmmaker Zeke (Griffin Newman) seeks to capture these good times on the GoPro camera attached to his wrist. But when the lake’s freakishly large fish appears during a mid-lake swim, the group’s carefree day takes a hellish turn.

Read more…

March 25, 2014
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Indiewire on BENEATH

From Sean Axmaker at Indiewire:

“Beneath” was one of the best horror film of 2013. But most people never heard about it.

Produced by Chiller, a horror-themed sibling to the SyFy cable network still struggling for name recognition and access to cable systems, “Beneath” is the first feature in almost a decade directed by Larry Fessenden. It played a few film festivals and received a limited (very limited) release in July before hitting cable on a channel that few viewers know exists. Which means that hardly anyone has had an opportunity to see the film. With the movie coming out on DVD and Blu-ray this week, that should change.

The limited coverage it has received so far, at least on the horror-centric sites, seems to have missed the point, or at least became so complacent in their own superiority to the conventions of the genre that they never noticed how cleverly Fessenden, who has been turning classic horror genres inside out for over twenty years, and the screenwriters transformed the conventions of this genre—notably the idiotic behavior of potential teenage victims—into defining elements of story and character.

“Beneath” is both a tribute to monster-in-the-woods and the creature-under-the-water horror (the opening dream sequence turns the “Jaws” prologue into a teenage wet dream) and a genuine indie drama in the guise of a horror film. It springs from Fessenden’s love of reimagining classic genres in modern terms and real-world situations, and for using the conventions to tell character stories. And it was accomplished on a commercial cable movie budget.

The opening act unfolds like a classic “teens under attack” horror film: six friends drive out to the woods to celebrate high school graduation with beer and fireworks on an island in the middle of an isolated lake. You can check off the tropes as they roll out: the competitive jock brothers, the nerdy video guy who won’t stop filming his friends (and provokes them in the name of drama), the bubbly and sweet-natured blonde babe that all the guys desire, the other girl (who just may also desire the blonde), and the brooding guy who guides them all to this hidden lake.

Johnny (Daniel Zovatto), the brooding one, knows of the legend a lake monster but neglects to tell his friends. Maybe he really doesn’t believe it, but he brings along a rustic charm just in case and he tries to give one to Kitty (Bonnie Dennison), the blonde. There’s even an old guy on the property (played by “Breaking Bad” drug kingpin Mark Margolis) with the usual warnings. Johnny assures him that he’ll keep the kids out of the water … because that’s gonna work out great. Sure enough, a monster of a catfish the size of a Buick comes prowling as soon as the kids jump in the water.

For the next half hour the kids do all the dumb, reckless, aggressive things guaranteed to strand them in the middle of the lake without a paddle. The jocks, pumped up on testosterone and their own egos, poke it with a stick, or in this case an oar. Old Man Catfish renders it to splinters with a mighty chomp. When they run out of paddles (because they aren’t bright enough to learn from their mistakes) they starts tossing one another overboard, voting members off the boat like a real-world “Survivor,” only here the losers become fish bait, sacrifices to distract an indifference fish god. And the aspiring director, Zeke, is there to record it all in his own reality horror.

Then something interesting happens. What first appears to be a lazy set-up to stake out its victims for the movie menace turns out to be an insidious insight to the true nature of its characters and the basis for the real conflict of the film. The crisis dredges up the envy, resentment, spite, and animosity these kids have been burying all this time under snarky remarks and dirty looks. Get past the genre and this is David Mamet in a boat, a savage portrait of survivalism at all costs. The so-called best friends turn on one other with a venomous vengeance.

“Beneath” turns into a smart, savage film that plays with the familiar conventions and then twists a knife in them, and it’s all done with a small cast, a confined space, and a script that reveals the worst in humanity. It looks less like a TV movie than a theatrical indie. Apart from the opening, it all takes place in the boat on the midst of a wooded lake, shot in the harsh light of day rather than the shadows of night, out in the open with a clean, sharp visual style. Not your usual visual strategy for a low-budget monster movie.

Read More…

March 25, 2014
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BENEATH Now Available on Blu-ray & DVD!

Happy BENEATH Blu-ray/DVD Release Day! Fessenden’s killer fish flick is now available at Scream Factory, Amazon, Walmart and more.

Special Features include
Audio Commentary by Larry Fessenden and Graham Reznick
A Look Behind BENEATH: Making the “Fish Movie”
Theatrical Trailer
Fessenden on JAWS
From the Web: WHAT THE ZEKE?
From The Web: WHAT’S IN BLACK LAKE?
Poster/Premiere Video
Digital Copy of the film