October 25, 2016
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Fangoria reports: Tales From Beyond the Pale live at Lincoln Center!

“if you get the opportunity to experience TALES FROM BEYOND THE PALE live, run, don’t walk!”

“Each TALE was each equally fascinating to come to life, with the old school charm and the certainly capable cast offering a spirited take on these stories. In the case of “Johnny Bernard,” the story was somewhat like a puzzle, but once the audience understood what was going on and the performers got into the groove of things, the tale was quite captivating, with a bittersweet ending one normally doesn’t expect from anthology horror.
“Game Night,” on the other hand, offered up a more jovial chemistry, with some laugh out loud moments (including a scene in which the guys realize they need a blood sacrifice) as well as a gloriously schizophrenic performance from Carter, who jumped between voices and characters with surprising finesse…. ”
Fangoria

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August 5, 2016
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THE MIND’S EYE on Fangoria

from Fangoria:MINDSEYEREVFEAT

FANG: You have a fantastic cast of genre veterans and up-and-comers: Graham Skipper, Lauren Ashley Carter, Larry Fessenden, etc. You even included former FANGO staffer Sam Zimmerman. How did you assemble such an excellent team for THE MIND’S EYE?

BEGOS: Very early on, I wrote the script with a couple people in mind, like Graham and Lauren, but we shot in Rhode Island, which is about a couple hours outside of New York, so we were sort of pulling from New York where a lot of the Glass Eye Pix family is. I’m a big fan of using kind of familiar faces but I feel like a lot of horror movies nowadays sort of use horror actors just because they’re like “Oh, this guy was in this movie,” and they’re not even particularly good. I’m pretty happy that we were able to assemble what I feel like are kind of some of the best of the best actors in the genre.

THE MIND’S EYE not only fantastic actors who embody their roles really well, but they feel like real people and they’re from horror movies. For instance, Jeremy Gardner, who I’m surprised hasn’t been in some more movies, and I can’t believe that people don’t utilize Larry Fessenden beyond beyond two minute cameos because he’s such a fucking phenomenal actor. Once I realized Larry was just going to play the sheriff, we were talking and I was like, “Dude, that’s such a throwaway role, man. I think I’m going to give you the Dad role.” I wanted to utilize him in that way he was in HABIT, so he killed it with these great takes and great references. He’s normally shoe-horned into these little roles, but I’m glad really showed up and shined through the movie.

read all at Fangoria:

watch THE MIND’S EYE on itunes!

May 25, 2016
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So long Gingold, we’ll miss you!

Mike Gingold has parted ways with Fangoria Magazine, long-time advocate
for Glass Eye Pix’s scrappy content since the ‘90s. In fact the as-yet-unprinted-next edition
of Fangoria has an article on the Fessenden Collection, and interviews with Fessenden and Graham Reznick,
plus a photo from STRAY BULLETS. Publish that Mag, guys!!
 
Meanwhile, here is a tribute to Mike, or Ging as he was affectionately called.
Lots of luck Mike, see you at the next event!!

 

May 9, 2016
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HABIT among Fangoria’s “The Dreadful Ten: 10 Awesome ’90s Horror Films!”

From Fango’s Ken Hanley

As someone who grew up watching the many horror films of the ’90s, it’s always a bit disappointing to hear the decade get so much flack for its contributions to the genre. Sure, the ’80s are a tough act to follow, considering how many phenomenal, practical FX-driven fright films were spawned during that time, but the ’90s has had its fair share of awesome scare fare, most of which are miles more memorable that the decades that have come since. Even the guilty pleasures of the ’90s- your DEEP BLUE SEAs and ANACONDAs and what-have-you- are much easier to defend than some of the stinkers of the ’80s! So with that on our macabre mind, FANGORIA has decided to list off ten absolutely awesome ’90s horror offerings for your creepy consideration!

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10. HABIT

With ‘90s New York serving as an all-too-essential backdrop, this story of a mourning, alcoholic misfit who finds solace in a dangerous new lover is one sure to haunt viewers long after the film has ended. Directed by and starring the incredible horror auteur Larry Fessenden, HABIT is a surreal and mature vampire love story that’s far bloodier and more adult than what the TWILIGHT crowd might expect.

see the rest of the selections (and the honorable mentions too!) 

 

April 4, 2016
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Fangoria creeps up on DARLING

DARLING will have a special screening at the Greater NY Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas (2548 Central Park Avenue, Yonkers, NY) this SATURDAY, April 9 at 9 p.m., with Carter and Morvant on hand for a Q&A moderated by FANGORIA’s Michael Gingold. Click HERE for more info.

April 1, 2016
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Fangoria visits the set of DARLING

Walking toward the Harlem townhouse serving as the key location of DARLING, your faithful Fango correspondent spots a couple of cops hanging around the front steps. It seems odd that such a small independent shoot would need this kind of security…

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Click HERE for the Fangoria article.

March 31, 2016
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Meet the characters from DARLING

December 2, 2015
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FANGO: McQuaid and Fessenden talk TALES

The suspiciously named new feature from Fango (The Cutting Room?????!) presents an archived interview with McQuaid and Fessenden.

Have you ordered your new box set yet? Ships end of week!!

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“For Season 3, the collaborators who joined us have been very big and as much as I love the challenge of writing these stories under the gun, it’s been equally refreshing to seduce others into TALES. So we have some old collaborators, some new collaborators as well…”

September 9, 2015
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Fangoria has First Exclusive Poster for DARLING

Fangoria’s got a brand new poster for Mickey Keating’s DARLING, which Fangoria describes as:

Written and directed by Mickey Keating, whose POD just saw release (see story here), DARLING stars JUG FACE’s Lauren Ashley Carter as a young woman who takes a job as a caretaker in a mysterious Manhattan mansion, where the last person to have the job committed suicide and her own sanity begins to crumble. The cast also includes Brian Morvant, Sean Young, Larry Fessenden, John Speredakos and Helen Rogers, and the film was produced by Fessenden, Jenn Wexler, Sean Fowler, Keating and Carter.

 

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For the full post and an exclusive image, head to Fangoria.

July 20, 2015
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Fangoria Revisits Fessenden’s HABIT

Fangoria just released an awesome write-up/revisit on HABIT, written, directed, and starring Fessenden. As writer Ken W. Hanley states, HABIT is “an astoundingly well-made tale of sex, blood and psychological distress that functions as not only a great horror film, but a great film period.”

From the article:

For those unfamiliar with this macabre indie masterpiece, HABIT follows a young, alcoholic man grieving the loss of his father and a recent break-up, who meets an enigmatic young woman at a Halloween party. Soon, he finds himself inexplicably obsessed with the woman, with whom he embarks in a sexually-driven relationship that involves violent nightly trysts and orgasmic bloodletting. However, the man soons finds himself experiencing an inexplicable illness, and as his symptoms become worse, he begins to suspect that his partner may be something more vicious than a vixen.

But to Fessenden’s credit, HABIT doesn’t look like a horror movie; in fact, the style of the film is incredible indicative of the work of his indie contemporaries Abel Ferrara, Jim Jarmusch and Richard Linklater in that there’s a very purposeful, intimate composition of every shot, yet the camera is allowed to breathe and move around. The film’s descent from urban fantasy to hallucinatory fever dream terror is gradual and contemplative but also hypnotic in a sense, and the audience gets almost a claustrophobic sense from the predicament from our hero. And once the film goes firmly into genre territory, it’s completely in line with the narrative, with drives just enough doubt into the situation to ride the line of psychological horror and full-on vampire flick.

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