Cutting Room
Read >> You Talkin’ to Me?

Read >> You Talkin’ to Me?

That’s one of the reasons I couldn’t let it go. Ostracized seems worse than [killed]—it’s like the end of “Jungleland.” The Bruce Springsteen song. “They wind up wounded, not even dead.” That’s related to the ending of Mean Streets. They’re not dead, but they can never go back.

READ >> Vittorio Storaro: The Tragedy of Modern Technology and it’s Effect on Cinematography

READ >> Vittorio Storaro: The Tragedy of Modern Technology and it’s Effect on Cinematography

When you’re making a photograph, a painting or a film, and you use some kind of light or some kind of color, you’re sending a message. If you don’t know it, you’re doing it according to how you feel is right. But if you’re aware of it, if you studied the symbology, physiology, dramaturgy of light or color, you can use them like a musician using do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti, do. You’re using red, orange, yellow, blue, violet. That’s the point.

READ >> All Seasons of the Witch: Magical Women in Post-Counterculture Cinema
WATCH >> Scene by scene: The Man Who Fell to Earth

WATCH >> Scene by scene: The Man Who Fell to Earth

“I don’t think that the cinematographer should have a style. A lot of them do. Not to belittle anybody, but Janusz Kaminski is a brilliant cinematographer but all his movies look the same. I’m a slave to the script and the story, which obviously means to the director…”

READ >> Scissor sisters

READ >> Scissor sisters

“If film cutting in many national cinemas is substantially a girl game, this raises the inevitable question: since film in general has been quite male-dominated, why is editing less so?”

WATCH >> Hitchcock/Truffaut now streaming on HBO
GO TO >> Cassavetes/Rowlands @ The Metrograph

GO TO >> Cassavetes/Rowlands @ The Metrograph

“Husband and wife John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands, rightfully considered the patron saints of American independent cinema, created art with their own money, in their own home, surrounded by friends and family.”

READ >> Peter Hutton

READ >> Peter Hutton

“The sea makes you aware of a different velocity of time… When you work on ships, it’s a job so you get locked into it. But there’s a lot of downtime. You’re able to space out and look at the atmosphere of the sea. That in itself is amazing. The sense of time is really different because you’re traveling so slow. Sometimes on ships you’re dead in the water. They shut them down and work on the engine or something like that and you’re just out there floating. In the middle of nowhere.”

WATCH >> A History of Horror

WATCH >> A History of Horror

1 year = 1 film. “A History of Horror” is a video essay which proposes a timeline of influential and aesthetically beautiful horror movies around the world since 1895 until 2016.

WATCH >> Shining